Skip to main content

Hula Hoop Rug

When I was asked for a tutorial on the hula hoop rug that The Boy and I were making, I thought that creating a video explaining the process would be a perfect experiment  for us. Unfortunately time is an issue and we've been swept up into summertime fun.  I read about the hula hoop rug in  Family Fun Magazine so instead of recreating the wheel (or the hoop), I'll just share their tutorial with you. I will however add a warning from my experience. DO NOT pull the weft too tight. When we began weaving, I thought it would make sense to pull tightly to get a tight weave...I thought that would be a good thing. It wasn't. The center of the rug bulges out and would make a good hat. When time permits, we will unweave and re-weave. :) Another note: this is a fairly easy craft yet it is more time consuming than I had expected. The Boy got bored of weaving and I had to stop when my fingers started to (painfully!) cramp. I am anxious to try it again, however for now the project has been set aside. 

 

 http://www.familyfun.go.com/ has a wealth of craft ideas for all ages.

 

Hula Hoop Rug as seen in Family Fun Magazine

by Nicole Blasenak Shapiro From FamilyFun Magazine
 
Total Time Needed: 2-3 Hours
 
What does it take to transform a pile of old T-shirts into spectacular works of woven art? Just a spare hula hoop or embroidery hoop and the techniques we'll show you here. The oversize looms and easy-to-use loops of T-shirt fabric make these projects particularly appealing to beginning weavers. Learn the basic hoop weaving technique by crafting a colorful accent rug to brighten up a room. And if you want to take the weaving a little further, check out our basket and chair pad weaves
Before you begin, some terms you need to know: the warp is the material you string on the hoop, the weft is the material you weave with.

Materials
  • Scissors
  • About a dozen T-shirts
  • 33-inch hula hoop
Instructions
  1. null For the warp, cut 1-inch-wide loops from the bodies of one or two tees (we found a boy's large worked best on our 33-inch hoop), removing the hem and stopping at the sleeves. Ideally these loops should all be the same color; we used two colors for clarity in our photographs. You'll need a total of 11 loops. For the weft, cut at least 50 loops from the remaining shirts. Save the unused sleeves for the basket project.
  2. null Stretch one warp loop over the hula hoop, as shown.
  3. Add and secure a second loop, perpendicular to the first.
  4. null Repeat, filling in the spaces, until all 11 loops are in place.
  5. null Push together two warp loops at the top of the hula hoop, as shown. This creates an odd number of warp spokes in your wheel, which allows the overunder pattern of the weft to alternate with each new row.
  6. Secure the first weft loop to the center of one of the warp spokes (we chose the doubled spoke from step 5) by wrapping it around the warp and then looping it back through itself.
  7. null Begin weaving the weft over and under the warp spokes, forming a tight spiral. For now, treat both parts of each warp spoke as a single unit, weaving over or under the two together. As you work, push the weft material toward the center of the hoop and keep it just snug. If you pull the weft tight, the rug will develop lumps or bends. When you reach the end of the piece of weft, add a new loop by threading it through the end of the first and back through itself.
  8. null When your rug is about 8 inches across, begin treating each warp spoke as two individual strips instead of a single unit, weaving over or under each strand instead of going over or under the doubled spoke. This increases the number of warp spokes, improving the structure of the project. When you get to the two warp spokes that you pushed together at the top of the loom, separate them. Treat one of the spokes as two individual strips, but continue to treat the other as a single spoke. This maintains the odd number of warp spokes.
  9. null When the rug is the size you want, but no closer than 8 inches from the edge of the hula hoop, snip open your weft loop.
  10. null Tie the ends around a warp spoke, and tuck the ends into the rug.
  11. null Cut the warp spokes off the hoop one at a time.
  12. null Tie the ends in pairs, then trim them to make a fringe or tuck them back into the rug.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Stay-cation: Fun Things to Do Around Rochester, MN

Family vacations are expensive. Gas, lodging, meals...oh, and then there is the admission cost to all the cool things that you want to see. Vacations cost more than a small fortune. Now figure in the loss of income (some of us don't get paid vacations) and you've "broke the bank". Enter the stay-cation. Gas costs are reduced. Lodging is covered. Meals, although still necessary, can be made at home and packed in a cooler. This summer, instead of taking a week off, I am taking a couple long weekends. One weekend we will be traveling "Up North" to visit my husband's college buddy. Otherwise we're keeping our exploring near to home.

Another benefit to a stay-cation is a little extra time for home projects. I can keep up with the laundry, instead of having a week's worth of laundry to do when I return home. Isn't that the worst part of vacation - the accumulation of dirty clothes you have to wash after being away from home all week? Gardening can…

Homemade Facial Cleansing Pads

My son become a teenager last fall and has since had to battle with teenage acne. At first he seemed to wear it with pride. His acne was a sign for all to see that he had made a passage from boyhood to manhood. This "rite of passage" has grown old and has been replaced with another rite of passage. Vanity. He's willing to try all the acne products at Walmart despite the way his mother freaks out as she reads the labels. Not to mention the cost. Thus began my search for a natural, homemade acne treatment for my dear man-child.

Common sense told me to start with tea tree oil and witch hazel. Tea tree oil is antibacterial and witch hazel is a natural astringent. Both helpful in treating acne.



Ingredients:
Water
Witch Hazel
Tea Tree Oil
Cotton Rounds

Mix:
1 cup water
1/2 cup witch hazel
10 drops of tea tree oil

Place cotton rounds in a container (I happened to have a small glass jar that the rounds fit perfectly in!) and top with mixture.





Day 27 ~ Italian Meatloaf in a (Freezer) Bag

Making meals ahead of time saves time, energy and stress as I discussed onDay 12. This is another meal that I prepared a few weeks ago when I made ten meals for the freezer. This recipe won my families approval so I can now share it with you! :) In a freezer bag combine: 2 lbs of ground beef (or turkey if you wish), 1/4 cup oatmeal, 2 T. Wildtree* Hearty Spaghetti Blend, 2 T. Wildtree*Rancher Steak Rub, 2 eggs. Now here's the fun part. Squish it all up to distribute the herbs into the meat. Label the bag and store in the freezer. Easy. Gathering supplies (if already on hand) and assembling this meal takes less then 15 minutes. The hard part is remembering ahead of time to take the meatloaf out of the freezer to thaw in the refrigerator overnight. This is where sticky notes on the refrigerator come in handy.  When ready to bake, form into a loaf and bake for 50-55 minutes. Add marinara sauce during last 10-15 minutes of baking. 
While baking the meatloaf prepare the "topping&qu…